KANE LINTON (KWANSEI GAKUIN UNIVERSITY)

EFFECTIVE PRONUNCIATION DRILLING FOR EFL STUDENTS: THE ISOLATION OF ACCENT SOUNDS. : LANGUAGE LEARNING

Over the course of a semester, students attending a university in Japan undertook several different approaches to drilling effective pronunciation and identification of sounds, specifically the sounds present in English and not Japanese. At the beginning of the class, as part of the warm-up and introduction to the class students were exposed to simple and limited language drilling processes. Pronunciation errors by non-native speakers of English are often caused by the transfer of their well-established L1 sound systems, this presentation also examines some of the characteristic phonological differences between Japanese and English. Furthermore, comparing the segmental and suprasegmental aspects of both languages, I also discuss several problematic areas of pronunciation for Japanese learners of English. By identifying the effectiveness of these approaches in negating issues in L1-L2 transfer attendees will be able to identify an approach that suits the needs of their students and institution.

Kane Linton is an Australian university lecturer with more than a decade of experience educating EFL students across three continents. His current research interests cover Computer-Assisted Language Learning, Task-Based Languages Teaching and textbook creation. Mr. Linton currently works as a university lecturer at Kwansei Gakuin University in Japan.