YOSSIRI YOSSATORN (NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY)

INTERCULTURAL SENSITIVITY OF BUDDHIST STUDENTS MAJORING IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION : INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

This study examines the influence of religion on intercultural sensitivity and intercultural interaction of Buddhist students majoring in Business Administration. The population was Buddhist freshmen from an international college in Thailand. The sample size was 83 respondents, 64 females and 24 males, and the sample average age was 20. The research design was a quantitative study, the research instrument was the Intercultural Sensitivity Scale along with a demographic questionnaire. The sampling method was convenience sampling. Findings showed that this sample exhibited high level of intercultural sensitivity, however, no significant difference was found in the level of intercultural sensitivity based on the importance of their religious beliefs. Contrasting their high level of intercultural sensitivity, these Buddhist students did not foster cross-cultural contact: they scarcely interacted with their culturally different peers, and the overwhelming majority did not have friends from different cultures or religions. The implications of the monoculture preferences in the business sector and international campuses are discussed, consequently, opportune intervention and intercultural trainings are advised.

Yossiri Yossatorn is a full-time lecturer at Navamindradhiraj University and currently a Ph.D. student, majoring in Digital Learning and Education, at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology. His research interests lie in the area of teaching and learning education, pedagogical technology, attitudes, metaphors, and language and culture.