Plenary and Featured Speakers

Keynote Speaker
Professor Charas Suwanwela
Chulalongkorn University
Plenary Speaker
Professor Mike Levy
The University of Queensland
Plenary Speaker
Professor Cynthia White
Massey University
Plenary Speaker
Mr.Randall Davis
University of Utah
Featured Speaker
Dr.Sarinya Khattiya
Chiang Mai University
Featured Speaker
Mr.Chaiwat Kaewphanngam
Silpakorn University
Featured Speaker
Mr.Allen Davenport
Cambridge University Press
Featured Speaker
Dr.Sompatu Vungthong
King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi
Featured Speaker
Professor Heyoung Kim
Chung-Ang University
Featured Speaker
Assoc. Prof. Dr.Thanomporn Laohajaratsang
Chiang Mai University
Featured Speaker
Dr.Pornpimol Sukavatee
Chulalongkorn University
Featured Speaker
Mrs.Claire Siskin
English Language Programs, U. S. Department of State
Featured Speaker
Asst. Prof. Dr. Anchalee Chayanuvat
Rangsit University
Invited Speaker
Professor Hajime Terauchi
Takachiho University
Featured Speaker
Dr.Marie Yeo
SEAMEO RELC
Invited Speaker
Asst. Prof. Maria Lisak
Korea TESOL
Featured Speaker
Professor Marc Helgesen
Miyagi Gakuin Women's University
Invited Speaker
Dr. Richmond Stroupe
Japan Association for Language Teaching
Invited Speaker
Miss Shubashini Suppiah
Malaysian English Language Teaching Association
Invited Speaker
Dr. Mitchellene Rivo
Pan-Asian Consortium of Language Teaching Societies
Invited Speaker
Miss Rovena Capel
Penang English Language Learning & Teaching Organization
Invited Speaker
Professor Hae-Ri Kim
The Applied Linguistics Association of Korea
Invited Speaker
Mrs. Finita Dewi
The Teaching of English as a Foreign Language in Indonesia

Professor Charas Suwanwela
Chulalongkorn University
Biography

Professor Charas Suwanwela is a Professor Emeritus in Surgery (Neurosurgery) at the Faculty of Medicine Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He is presently chairman of the University Council of the Prince of Songkla University, Thailand He graduated Doctor of Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine Chulalongkorn University in 1955. He received the Anandamahidol Foundation scholarship to further his training in neurological surgery at the University of Chicago and the North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Bowman-Gray School of Medicine in the United States. He served to establish the neurosurgical section of the Department of Surgery at Chulalongkorn Hospital. He was appointed the first Director of Chulalongkorn University Institute of Health Research, and the first Vice-president for Research Affairs at Chulalongkorn University, during the period from 1975 to 1985, when Chulalongkorn University was transforming into a research university.

Then, over the next twenty-five years, he became Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, President of the Chulalongkorn University, and Chairman of the Chulalongkorn University Council. He also served briefly as President of the Asian Institute of Technology,

At the National level, he served as Chairman of the Policy Committee of the Thailand Research Promotion Fund, Chairman of the Higher Education Commission, member of the Thai Medical Council, member of the Thai Red Cross Society Committee, member of the National Committee for Thailand Quality Awards. He was a Member of the National Legislative Assembly and a Senator. He was elected as President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Thailand, and President of the Neurological Association of Thailand.

Internationally, he served as a member of the Administrative Board of the International Association of Universities during 1988 to 1996. He was Chair of the Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED), member of the WHO Southeast Asia Regional and Global Advisory Committee for Health Research (ACHR), UNESCO Advisory Committee on Higher Education and member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for Asia and the Pacific of the UNESCO Global Forum on Higher Education, Research and Knowledge. He was President of the ASEAN Neurosurgical Society and a member of the Executive Board of the Asian and Australasian Society of Neurological Surgery. He also served on the World Conference on Higher Education Preparatory Committee, and on the Board of the Network of Community Oriented Educational Institutions for Health Sciences.

His publications include more than 300 articles in neurosurgery, medicine, health services, research and higher education. He wrote 20 books (mainly in Thai), whose titles include “On the Road to a Research University”, “Higher Education in Thailand”, “Thoughts on Higher Education”, “Re-engineering of Higher Education: The Case of Chulalongkorn University”, “Pitfalls on the Road to Good Governance” and “Autonomy of Thai Universities”. He was editor and co-editor of books, such as “Chula’s Values”, “Future of Thai Higher Education Amidst Challenges of Free Trade”, “Plagiarism” and, “Higher Education, Research and Knowledge in the Asia-Pacific Region”.


Professor Cynthia White
Massey University

Bio data:
Cynthia White is Professor of Applied Linguistics, Massey University, New Zealand, and Research Director for the College of Humanities & Social Sciences. She has published widely on distance and online learning, learner autonomy, learning strategies, and agency and emotion in language learning and teaching.

Presentation Title:
Language teacher agency in the digital age: reimagining the margins of practice

Abstract:
Globalization and new technologies have transformed the communication landscape, in terms of how we communicate (sound, image, text) and with whom – and these changes raise fundamental questions for language learning and teaching in the digital age. In such a context language teachers face multiple pressures to respond to changing contexts whether through policy changes, curricular changes, or from the expectations of their students, parents and employers. In this plenary address I draw on recent research into language teacher agency to explore how teachers respond to on-going challenges within a continuously digitizing world. I argue that the concept of agency is a useful framework to understand how teachers choose to act and the choices they make as they seek to reconcile local practices, virtual spaces and global forces in their TESOL classes. To conclude I present practical implications for students, teachers, teacher educators and institutions.


Professor Mike Levy
The University of Queensland

Bio data:
Dr Mike Levy is an Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. His research work includes studies on the distinctive role of technology in mediating language learning, including how the technology itself shapes the interaction at both the macro and the micro level.

Presentation Title:
Digital Literacy

Abstract:
Digital literacy is not a new concept. Paul Gilster wrote an important and influential book called ‘Digital Literacy’ (Wiley, 1997) twenty years ago, and in that work he highlighted many of the opportunities and challenges. Since the publication of Gilster’s book, many of the technologies he mentioned have disappeared. Also, the digital literacy he then considered as an undifferentiated whole has since been divided into numerous sub-literacies such as gaming literacy and mobile literacy. But while much has changed, there remains much that has not, in my view. Many of the core ideas, issues and questions that Gilster considered have, if anything, become even more important today, for example content evaluation and ‘fake news’. In this presentation, I will explore this background to the topic, and consider how key factors have shaped and perhaps will shape our engagement with new technologies and language learning into the future.


Mr.Randall Davis
University of Utah

Bio data:
For 30 years, Randall Davis has worked as a teacher and materials developer, specializing in educational technology, language assessment, and teacher training. He is the creator of the Web site, Randall’s ESL Cyber Listening Lab (www.esl-lab.com), and teaches at the English Language Institute at the University of Utah, USA.

Presentation Title:
Embracing and Celebrating Imperfection on the Road to Better Teaching

Abstract:
During the past 30 years, significant changes have taken place in the world of language education and technology that have altered the way teachers view students, themselves, and their profession. As educators, we tend to openly acknowledge that change is a natural and vibrant part of our lives, both professionally and personally, but we often fear discussing and embracing change when it exposes our limitations, vulnerability, and uncertainties to others. Since entering the field in the 1980s, Randall has experienced the rise and fall of different technologies and educational philosophies that have had a significant impact on his own evolution as a teacher. These changes have not always been easy or painless, and Randall has had his own share of challenges and mistakes. Randall opens up candidly and recounts his own career journey and highlights six keys to navigating a rewarding path to personal excellence within the language-teaching profession.


Mr.Allen Davenport
Cambridge University Press

Bio data:
llen Davenport is the Teacher Development Manager for the Southeast Asian Region at Cambridge University Press. Allen has been involved in English language teaching for more than a decade in various roles including teacher, academic program coordinator, certified examiner for multiple assessment organizations, and teacher trainer.

Presentation Title:
Rescuing the babies from the bathwater: Keeping what matters when integrating technology into teaching.

Abstract:
Everest syndrome (Maddux, cited in Gallo & Horton, 1994) alludes to the story of the intrepid mountaineer George Mallory, who famously stated he desired to climb Mount Everest ‘because it’s there.’ The syndrome, in this case, refers to the feeling many teachers may have about using technology in the classroom -- a temptation that by its mere existence, the necessity and use of technology must be self-evident. This has led to many educators dedicating long, and in some cases, pointless hours focusing on using technology rather than integrating it into the learning process. In this talk, the presenter will highlight some considerations and frameworks technology integration into the approaches (and not merely the techniques) of language teaching, while arguing that the use of ‘technology for technology’s sake’ will lead educators to the same (metaphorical) fate as George Mallory, who died on the mountain he was trying to conquer.


Mrs.Claire Siskin
English Language Programs, U. S. Department of State

Bio data:
Claire Bradin Siskin is an enthusiastic practitioner of computer-assisted language learning (CALL). Her principal interests are faculty development, research in CALL, and international education. Her editorial experience includes the editorial boards of CALL Journal and CALICO Journal. She has given presentations in 20 countries. See http://www.edvista.com/claire for more information.

Presentation Title:
The Teacher's Role in Digital Literacy

Abstract:
As teachers prepare their students for the digital age, what should their role be in ensuring literacy among their students? Certainly they should be literate themselves, but exactly what does that mean and what are their responsibilities? Most importantly, how will digital literacy enhance the students’ acquisition of English, and how can teachers help to bring this about? The presenter will explore the relationship between “digital literacy” and “computer assisted language learning” (CALL) and where teachers belong in this scenario. She will discuss the paradox in which technology is praised for its effectiveness at freeing up the teacher's time but at the same time scoff at the notion that technology might replace teachers. In this contradiction, teachers are being sent a mixed message. She will argue that the relationship between technology and the language teacher should be examined candidly. Audience participation will be encouraged.


Professor Heyoung Kim
Chung-Ang University

Bio data:
Heyoung Kim is a professor of Chung-Ang University in Seoul, Korea and also technologies director of Asia TEFL. Her major interest is in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL), such as L2 digital literacy, mobile-assisted language learning, and flipped classroom. Her recent publications are “Implementation of SMART Teaching 3.0: Mobile-based self-directed EFL teacher professional development (The Journal of Asia TEFL, 13(4)),” “Mobile application design and evaluation for English speaking practice through social interaction (MALL, 20(1))” “An exploratory study on the digital identity formation of Korean university EFL learners (ETPC, 14(2))”

Presentation Title:
The Value of Digital Storytelling as an L2 Narrative Practice

Abstract:
igital storytelling is one of effective ways of developing digital literacy. The purpose of this study was to investigate how digital storytelling (DST) can help second language learners’ L2 narrative practice. To this end, the present study examined pairs of personal narrative scripts produced by 50 Korean college students, respectively for their self-created videos and oral speeches. The two types of the narrative scripts were both qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed based on the ‘good story’ framework’. The findings demonstrate that L2 learners’ narratives become better stories when they are practiced in DST, particularly in terms of expressing one’s feeling and showing awareness of the audience. Also, the availability of multiple modes of expression was found to expand their narrative topics and elicit their stories and visions more powerfully. This study concludes that developing digital literacy by DST in L2 class helps language learners to effectively enhance both oral and written narrative skills.


Professor Marc Helgesen
Miyagi Gakuin Women's University

Bio data:
Marc Helgesen is author of over 170 books, textbooks and professional articles including Pearson’s popular English Firsthand series. He has lead teachers development workshops on five continents. He teaches at Miyagi Gakuin Women's University and in the M.A.TESOL program at Nagoya University of Foreign Studies.

Presentation Title:
Do-It-Yourself NeuroELT: 7 keys for making your textbook more brain-friendly

Abstract:
Brain Science in education pioneer Leslie Hart famously said “Designing curriculum without knowing about the brain is like designing a glove without knowing about the hand.” But whoever wrote your textbook was thinking about grammar and vocabulary, hopefully tasks and motivation – and was probably not focused on brain science. But the brain is where learning occurs. Given that we forget most sensory input almost instantly, how can teachers make sure the important content is noticed/remembered? This takes on additional importance since our learners are bombarded by data, actions and distractions on the Internet. This session will introduce 7 quick and easy ways to make your textbook more appropriate for brain-compatible learning. We’ll look specifically at modifying textbook tasks to make them better. They include (1) emotion, (2) providing choice, (3) novelty [ever notice how “clickbait” on the internet influences your action? There’s an important evolutionary reason], (4) multi-sensory learning, (5) challenge [gamemakers are masters of this one – that’s why people get “addicted” to on-line games] (6) creativity and (7) personalization. All the ideas are based on established science and replicable studies. With each of these items, we’ll consider digital applications and pitfalls. More on brain science in ELT is available on the presenter’s website: tinyurl.com/DIYneuroELT.


Dr.Marie Yeo
SEAMEO RELC

Bio data:
Dr Marie Yeo has been involved in TESOL for the past 30 years. Currently at SEAMEO RELC, she trains teachers and trainers from all over Southeast Asia. Her current research interests are Assessment for Learning, Blended Learning, CLIL and Learner Engagement. Dr Yeo is currently Editor-in-Chief of the RELC Journal.

Presentation Title:
"To Blend or Not to Blend: That is not the question": Online Language Teacher Education

Abstract:
Over the last decade, the number of online language teacher education (OLTE) courses offered internationally has increased. Such courses provide substantial pedagogical, logistic and financial benefits. In 2013, SEAMEO RELC’s flagship Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics was delivered for the first time in a blended mode. This presentation reports on the development, implementation and evaluation of the course, looking from the perspectives of all stakeholders. Lessons learnt from nearly five years of implementation provide insights to (I) administrators on how to prepare the institution and teaching faculty; (2) lecturers on how to prepare and “protect” themselves before and during blending; and (3) participants on how to maximize learning opportunities in OLTE courses. Academic issues related to plagiarism and dropout and technical issues including choice of technology and inequitable access are addressed. The paper concludes by suggesting that the question nowadays is not whether but how to blend.


Miss Shubashini Suppiah
Malaysian English Language Teaching Association

Bio data:
SHUBASHINI SUPPIAH is a teacher educator at an institute of teacher education (ITE) in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. She is currently a doctoral candidate at University Malaysia Sabah. Her areas of research interest include pre service teacher development focusing on the area of reflective practice and professional teacher development for novice/beginning ESL teachers. She has presented at various conferences such as the Asia TEFL and TEFLIN and has also published several articles in the Institute of Teacher Education (ITE) research journals.

Presentation Title:
XPLORING AN ONLINE APPROACH TO REFLECTIVE PRACTICE THROUGH THE COMMUNITY OF INQUIRY (COI) FRAMEWORK

Abstract:
The present study utilized the community of inquiry framework (COI) conceptualized by Garrison, Anderson and Archer (2000) in exploring the affordances of an online collaborative and dialogue based reflective practice approach between 3 teacher educator mentors and 16 pre service ESL teachers during a 12 week teaching practice phase in an institute of teacher education (ITE) in Malaysia. The main objectives of the study is to investigate the nature of the reflective thinking that were displayed through the reflections posted online and through the comments and replies exchanged in line with the ‘cognitive’ and ‘social presence’ within the COI framework. The study also sought to explore the contributions of the teacher educators as the “knowledgeable other” to the online discussions by applying the concept of the ‘teaching’ presence as outlined in the COI framework. The findings which were gathered from the online reflections and the threaded discussions revealed that while most of the data were in accordance to the key indicators of the COI, there were emerging themes that could illuminate other imbedded issues that would require further exploration.


Dr.Pornpimol Sukavatee
Chulalongkorn University

Bio data:
Pornpimol Sukavatee is currently the Deputy Director of the EIL Program and the Chair of Foreign Language Teaching Division, Curriculum and Instruction Department, at the Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University. Her research interests are technology- supported language learning, and curriculum and materials development. Her contact email is at jjpornpimol@gmail.com.

Presentation Title:
A Paradigm Shift in English Language Learning Context in Thailand

Abstract:
Language education in Thailand has been recently shifting to the preparation for Thai learners at all levels to be ready for the 21st century required skills which are core subjects, life and career Skills, learning and innovation skills, and information, media and technology skills. This presentation focuses on the local issues and research trends of digital language learning. The impact of using technology with language pedagogy in Thai classroom context has been explored. Opportunities and challenges from implementing technology in language instruction will be presented. What and how Thai learners are required in terms of digital ability by national policy, Thailand 4.0 will be brought to table. Finally, TESOL Technology Standards will be discussed as a guidance for English language teachers in Thailand.


Dr.Sarinya Khattiy
Chiang Mai University

Bio data:
Sarinya Khattiya has been teaching English as a Foreign Language in Thailand for more than ten years. She has a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics and Educational Linguistics from the University of Melbourne. She works as a lecturer at Chiang Mai University in Thailand. She has worked extensively in the field of technology-enhanced language learning. Her recent works include instructional and content designs of English language courses for course management system (CMS). In addition, she recently participated in the Thailand Massive Open Online Course (ThaiMOOC) project, which offers courses to anyone wanting to learn English.

Presentation Title:
English Language Learning in MOOCs

Abstract:
Access to open education, open content and open educational resources (OER) is gaining more and more attention worldwide. The arrival of Massive Online Open Courses, or MOOCs, has changed the idea of language education and has oriented learners to language courses that are open, participatory, distributed and at the same time support the idea of lifelong networked learning. However, the design and implementation of MOOCs with focus on language learning have not been scrutinized. This study explored the potentiality for application of MOOCs in English language education. The platforms and the instructional designs were evaluated. Although some pedagogical limitations were observed, MOOCs could be an effective educational tool to offer access to quality education, especially for those who have a strong desire and motivation to extend their knowledge.


Dr.Sompatu Vungthong
King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi

Bio data:
Sompatu Vungthong is a lecturer at King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, Thailand, and a PhD graduate from Department of Education, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, and. Her research interests include ELT, critical discourse analysis, and social semiotics. She has published in journals (e.g. TESOL Quarterly) and written a book chapter.

Presentation Title:
Why does multimodality matter? Multimodal research and its implications for ELT

Abstract:
The current era of technological advancement has brought about more research on a variety of modes of communication embedded in new educational tools. Through a multimodal perspective, all interactions are multimodal, including interactions with learning materials (e.g. reading a passage which features different types of typography, images and visual design) and classroom interactions (e.g. teachers’ use of speech, gaze, gesture, and pedagogical space to enable their teaching). As verbal language is merely one among many other modes of communication, it is imperative to encourage a better understanding of how various modes interact and create learning in order to ensure better pedagogical practices. This paper encompasses a review of multimodal research on learning and teaching with the focus on educational affordances in new technologies and classroom interactions.


Assoc. Prof. Dr.Thanomporn Laohajaratsang
Chiang Mai University

Bio data:
Dr. Thanomporn Laohajaratsang is the former Director of the Information Technology Service Center (2005-2017) where she now works as the consultant and is an Associate Professor, Department of Learning Technology, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Her research interests include digital innovation in teaching and learning and design of future learning environments.

Presentation Title:
The Next-Generation Digital Learning Approach

Abstract:
During the past decade, we have witnessed a dramatic change in the world of digital development. Digital technology has become a vital part of everyday life for all of us especially the 21st Century learners. In response to the limitations of traditional learning environment, a group of innovative educators have recently tried to propose the next-generation digital learning approach, a new learner-centered model that will increasingly characterize higher education practice. Instead of 21st century learners trying hard to fit themselves in the existing learning system, the next-generation digital learning approach will offer learning platforms that will be designed in a way that allow them to be capable of adapting itself to offer personalize learning based on learning analytic which can collect and analyze students’ big data. What does it mean by the term “Next-Generation”? Next-generation of “What”? What is the “Digital Learning Approach”? What have been characterized as this generation learning approach? What defines a shift from one generation to the next? What drives that shift? All of these questions will be addressed and answered during the talk.


Mr.Chaiwat Kaewphanngam
Silpakorn University

Bio data:
Chaiwat Kaewphanngam, founder of Teachers of Million Minds Project, is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Education, Silpakorn University. He is the author of book on Digital Technologies for 21st Century Language Teaching and Learning. His research focuses on Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge of both pre-service and in-service teachers.

Presentation Title:
Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Integration into Pre-Service Programs and Barriers of Teachers Using Technology

Abstract:
The Thailand education policy to promote integration of technology in the learning system is gradually gaining awareness. More teachers are using technology to promote a communicative language teaching and learning. Nevertheless, there are still much to be explored to support teachers. Several studies have revealed that the teachers are facing a myriad of problems when applying technology. Such problems include the availability of appropriate infrastructure, teacher and student perceptions and the lack of necessary skills in applying technology. While the in-service English teachers are encouraged by the society to integrate more technological devices in the classes, there seems to be a mismatch with the pre-service English teacher curricular to prepare them. Teachers have shown insufficient preparation and lack of the necessary skills to handle integration of technology in the classroom. This session is aimed at sharing some of the bottlenecks in the integration of technology into the learning system.


Asst. Prof. Maria Lisak
Korea TESOL

Bio data:
Maria Lisak teaches Public Administration & Social Welfare at Chosun University in Gwangju, South Korea. She is currently working on her EdD in Literacy, Culture and Language Education through Indiana University. She researches literacy sponsorship, funds of knowledge and cosmopolitan literacies. She is a lifetime member of KOTESOL.

Presentation Title:
Electronic Teaching Journal: Streamline Data Collection for Reflecting Practices

Abstract:
Technology gives teachers a variety of ways to capture classroom learning multimodally. Collecting student work to give feedback is helpful to the student, but can become cumbersome for the teacher to see the 'big picture' and notice different areas or patterns that can improve the learning interaction. The workshop presenter shares how she has streamlined the collection of student work and teaching artifacts. Examples of textual, visual and multimodal materials from her students' work as well as teaching artifacts, like lesson plans, in-class notes, audio and video, critical incident reports and reflective teacher journaling are gathered into a report document for analysis and reflection. Using a diary application that makes a timeline report of captured materials helps to get a bird's eye view of the learning experience to analyze student work, and also reflect on teaching, feelings, and patterns for improvement or change.


Dr.Mitchellene Rivo
Pan-Asian Consortium of Language Teaching Societies

Bio data:
Mitchellene Vigilia-Rivo, Ph.D. is into teaching English as a Second Language for 15 years and is currently the Senior Education Program Specialist of the Department of Education, Dagupan City Division. She also served as the Project Coordinator of English Access Micro-Scholarship Program and a MOOC Camp Facilitator.

Presentation Title:
Task Types and Negotiation of Meanings

Abstract:
Task-based language teaching approach is one of the answers needed to be address when dealing with differentiated learning. This paper presentation aims to present the effects of a particular task type to classroom interaction specifically on negotiation of meaning. It will discuss how students in actual classroom setting negotiate meaning by analyzing the utterances made and categorizing such utterance into t-unit (Hall, 1966), c-unit (Brock, 1986) and fragments using the General Typology of Communication Tasks by Pica, Kanagy and Falodun (1993). This study used video recordings of classroom proceedings in order to get the actual events in the respondents’ classes. The video recordings were transcribed and analyzed and yielded that quality of negotiation of meaning had high occurrence during Opinion Exchange Task as compared to other task used in each class.


Miss Rovena Capel
Penang English Language Learning & Teaching Organization

Bio data:
Rovena Elaine Capel is an English Language lecturer at the Institute of Teacher Education, Penang. She has been the President of PELLTA since 2002. She has a M.Ed. In TESOL (USM, Malaysia) and a B.A (Hons) in Modern English Studies (University of Wales, Cardiff, UK).

Presentation Title:
VISUALIZING THE INVISIBLE IN LITERATURE THROUGH AUGMENTED REALITY

Abstract:
This workshop focusses on how to help students visualize the real world through a literary text using their smart phones. In this approach, students are able to “see” a poem come alive as video contents are linked to images through augmented reality technology. Digital technology is integrated into the classroom through the use of mobile apps with a focus on fun learning. This method engages students in the learning process and promotes the concept of knowledge–building in the 21st century classroom. Participants will have an opportunity to try and prepare their own “Augmented Reality” contents for literature lessons during this workshop.


Professor Hae-Ri Kim
The Applied Linguistics Association of Korea

Bio data:
Hae-Ri Kim is a professor of the Department of English Education at Seoul Nat’l University of Education, Korea. Her teaching and research areas are Literacy Education, Children’s Literature in Education, EFL Materials Development, and Developing EFL Teacher Training Programs. Currently she has been developing various teacher training programs for primary school English teachers.

Presentation Title:
Utilizing Storybook Reading Videos in Literature-Based Instruction

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cross-age reading by using literacy texts for children. Twenty-four students each from second and fifth grade participated in this study. Storybook videos from Youtube were utilized for preparing 6 sessions of reading activities. The fifth graders voluntarily engaged in the repeated reading when storybook reading videos were used because it provided interesting reading as well as taught them how to read aloud the texts. The first finding was that the students' literacy gradually developed and repeated reading utilizing storybook videos helped them build reading fluency and also positively affected comprehension. The second finding was that the older students had a chance to understand others and improved their self-directed learning capabilities. The successful experience stimulated their internal motivation that became the basis of their self-directed learning. This process provided the fifth graders an opportunity to understand others.


Mrs. Finita Dewi
The Teaching of English as a Foreign Language in Indonesia

Bio data:
Finita holds a B.A. in English Literature and an M.A. in TESOL Studies. Finita is an English Lecturer at Indonesia Education University. Her expertise is in CALL, EFL teaching method and technology integration. In addition, Finita is also a teacher trainer who has collaborated with some educational institutions such as British Council, SEAQIL, SEAMOLEC.

Presentation Title:
Technology Integration in Language Classes: from learning resources to learning tools

Abstract:
A successful technology integration in the classroom is not determined by the technology, but how the technology enhances the learning process. The purpose of this case study was to examine how a junior high school English teacher developed her skills to enhance and transform student learning through the use of technology, and aligned it with the Indonesian national curriculum. The case study data were obtained from 1) transcript of discussion on collaborative lesson design, 2) classroom observation and 3) post implementation interview. The result of this study indicated that the teacher has made a gradual shift from using technology as learning resources only to using technology as students’ learning tools. In addition to her ability to align the selection of technology with the curriculum goals, the teacher also developed her fluency with technology and become more creative in using technology to help students accomplish real tasks.


Professor Hajime Terauchi
Takachiho University

Bio data:
Hajime Terauchi has BA in Civil Law from Keio University, Japan and a MA and PhD in English Language Teaching from the University of Warwick, U.K., and Professor of English Language Education and Dean of the faculty of Commerce at Takachiho University, Japan. His research interests include ESP and legal culture. He is President of JACET

Presentation Title:
EAP in University Education in Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong

Abstract:
This paper reports a comparison of programs of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) at the tertiary level in Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong. In the case of Japan, the significance of EAP education is widely recognized, the implementation of university-wide EAP curricula is limited. Wide variation exists among EAP curricula depending on the individual university, faculty, and instructor. To clarify the situation, the JACET Special Committee on English for Academic Purposes has launched a research project entitled “EAP education in Japan: Towards developing a quality assurance framework” supported by Eiken Foundation of Japan (AY2014-15, 2016-17). This paper reviews the current situation of EAP curricula in Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong, and then identifies the issues involved in quality assurance. Finally, this paper addresses the future prospecs for EAP in Japan as well as other Asian countries.


Dr. Richmond Stroupe
Japan Association for Language Teaching

Bio data:
Richmond Stroupe has worked with university and professional language learners from Asia since 1989. He is the Chair of the Master’s Program in International Language Education: TESOL at Soka University, and is the President of the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT). Richmond’s research interests include curriculum and professional development.

Presentation Title:
Meeting the needs of expanding, diverse, international student populations

Abstract:
Increasing student mobility has far-reaching implications for the global education market. Because of increased competition, institutions are often attempting to attract international students to supplement their enrollment numbers, often encouraged by Ministries of Education. However, institutions cannot view international students from diverse regional and educational backgrounds simply as one homogeneous group, but they must be considered based on their cultural and educational backgrounds. This study evaluated the extent to which a pre-service Masters in TESOL Program provided in a Japanese context addresses the needs of a multicultural student body. Current students, alumni, faculty members, and administration evaluated the graduate program. Data analysis indicated positive aspects of the program, yet also revealed that actual student needs are quite complex. Recommendations are made as to how to effectively address these diverse needs, not only for this specific graduate program, but also for similar programs that cater to a diverse multicultural student population.


Asst. Prof. Dr. Anchalee Chayanuvat
Rangsit University

Bio data:
Asst. Prof. Anchalee Chayanuvat (Ed.D) is Dean of the Faculty of Education at Rangsit University, Prathum Thani, Thailand. She has had extensive experience in teaching English, both EFL and ESL in Thailand and Brunei Darussalam. Her publications include “Constructing Your Course Materials for Effective English Teaching” (1996) and “Problem-based learning, (2001)

Presentation Title:
When Gen-Y Students Are Taught English by a Babyboomer Teacher

Abstract:
When a babyboomer teacher met Gen-Ys students in an English Language class, conflicts and dissatisfaction were expected to happen due to the gaps in values and behavior of the different generations as frequently revealed in literature. This presentation explores how the teacher responded to the needs and expectations of a class of 12 Gen-Y students. The presenter will first discuss the 21st Century as a century of tremendous changes in teaching and learning and what teachers of English are expected to do to cope. Then, the presenter will describe how the course was designed for active learning with the support of a digital class to reduce the gap with a focus on the students’ changing ways of learning, appropriate learning materials, changing roles of students, changing roles of teachers, the planned teaching and assessment techniques. Finally, the presenter will analyze why and how the digital class can enrich the course.